Tag Archive: z blogs

  1. Making a Difference, Starting With the Woman in the Mirror

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    I’m just a young, Black woman. What difference can I really make? I find myself asking this question to the girl in the mirror constantly. My smile slowly fading to a minimal grin as I stare back at someone who’s just one person. 

    The lack of diversity within the classroom has always been something I’ve noticed since I was a kid. Now, in college, it amazes me how much this hasn’t changed. Serving on the executive board of Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) at the University of Dayton, I often feel like there’s something more I need to do in the world of public relations. 

    When I first entered the public relations (PR) world in my second semester of sophomore year, I wasn’t shocked to see that I was the only black kid when walking into the room. After all, I attend a predominantly white institution. Now, when dealing with internships and learning about the world of PR, I constantly hear about the lack of diversity around the world in this career field. 

    Hearing this statement in the midst of working on an initiative like the Inez Y. Kaiser GKC-PRSA Memorial Scholarship Fund has given me the motivation to want to push forward diversity in the workplace.

    That girl who stares back at herself and wonders what change she can make in the world gains her smile back.

    Women like Inez Y. Kaiser and any other modern women in communications who have had “firsts” probably had the same thoughts. No, we can’t change the world as one person. However, we can make a difference with the small stepping stones we make.

    From graduating from college to breaking stereotypes, I have found that being a Black woman in the professional world in and of itself sets me up to be a trailblazer. For too many years we’ve only seen success as white or male. Looking at Kaiser accomplishing something like launching a firm with national clients as a Black woman is inspiration alone. 

    I may not be able to completely turn around the world of PR but I can start somewhere. Simple things like being on the exec board of PRSSA and using my voice on that platform is something

    Advocating for change and even hoping for change somehow gives the earth a little push on its axis even further. I can’t wait to see what all I can accomplish with just the girl in the mirror.

    Check out this video created by Zinaejah Ozier that emphasizes Inez Y. Kaiser and other modern trailblazers in communication. 

    Qualifying students can apply for the Inez Y. Kaiser GKC-PRSA Memorial Scholarship Fund now! 

  2. Experience as the “Only One” in an Educational Setting

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    Picture this. It’s 9:00am on a Monday morning. You’re walking to class and you’re trying your hardest to keep your head up after a long weekend of studying, social mishaps, and finding yourself. You get to class and all you see is the back of dozens of heads of people with skin not like yours. You push yourself to relate, but it’s just not working…These are the thoughts that go through my head on a daily basis. 

    From the time I was little, I’ve had these experiences. Growing up in a place like Flint, Michigan then moving to the suburbs of Grand Blanc, Michigan in order to get a better education was both rewarding and scarring. Like the scraping at the knee, everything I had known before shifted into a culture that I tried so hard to mold into. 

    In classrooms I would sit and glance at the few brown-skinned children with puffy hair in hopes of making an automatic connection in an unknown world. Quickly, I was linked with a child like me, who’s friends became my friends. 

    Thinking back on this reminds me of the book, “Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria: And Other Conversations About Race” by Beverly Daniel Tatum. Oftentimes when walking into a school setting, clusters of different races are boldly scattered around the lunch room and on the playground. My own experiences see this phenomenon as a level of comfortability. This same dynamic stands at the university level. 

    I sometimes question why segregated school were pronounced unconstitutional decades ago, yet we are still in school were getting a good education means going to a predominantly white school. 

    It can be hard attending a school where you’re one of the “only ones.” As a writer, I know the power of relatability and establishing relationships within a story as well as the real world. For this reason, I believe the stress endured by brown-skinned individuals all over campus can be severe. It almost seems like the lack of relatability is so normal that no one really seems to pay attention to what we have to go through. This very situation caused me to be stuck between choosing a HBCU (Historically Black College and University) and a PWI (Predominantly White Institution). On one hand, I wanted to attend a place where my people were better represented and supported in one space. On the other hand, the benefits of a PWI can be far greater when it comes to funding and great opportunities.

    For the generations after me, I don’t want them to have to choose. At times, choosing can be the difference between an understanding of one’s mental health and a push to the side due to the normalization of being the only Black kid. 

    To read Zinaejah Ozier previous blog, click here.



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