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Category Archive: Power of Pink Virtual Internship Program

Wrapping Up This Summer’s Internship



This summer has been filled with so many challenges and opportunities. In the end, the opportunities and ending result far outweighed any challenge that was faced. Here are a few of the highlights from this summer here at Germinder + Associates.

On my return, I was excited to see all the new opportunities I’d be able to take on due to everything I got to do last year. With the “Interviews with Zinaejah” series, I got to speak with so many awesome Black professionals and with the Inez Y. Kaiser Initiative being one of the main focuses for this summer, I was excited to see what I could accomplish next. 

Lea-Ann and I decided to enter my “Interviews with Zinaejah” series into the 2021 PRSA-NY Big Apple Awards. Upon entry, I was just happy to learn how to enter into an award and everything that comes with it. It was a process, but it allowed me to see the ins and outs of getting something submitted. 

Getting started on creating content, I was excited to use my creativity to create the new “Z Blogs” idea where I linked the story of Inez Y. Kaiser to my own story and made a blog out of it. I ended with six blogs which were all very successful. My final blog featured an interview with Richlynn Kaiser Bailey, granddaughter of Inez Y. Kaiser. It was such an honor to get to speak with her and hear the amazing stories and advice that she learned from a legend. 

In the midst of creating my blogs, I also did some work with our Good News For Pets site. As an affiliate partner of Chewy, lots of posts centered around the many summer deals they showcased. I was ecstatic to see the Chewy official account on social media respond and thank me for promoting their products. It was such a cool experience and has even become a bragging right of mine whenever I mention to family and friends what it is I do at my internship. 

One of the most rewarding parts of this summer was creating content for the Greater Kansas City Public Relations Society of America (GKC-PRSA) social media pages. After emailing the entire advisory board about my project, I was able to get quotes for each of them that symbolized the importance of the scholarship and any meaningful words they wanted to say about Inez Y. Kaiser. The final project was beautiful and it was so rewarding knowing that I was able to give each member a voice. 

Along with the project, I created a video to help promote the scholarship. After advice from board member, Darius Lane, I was able to come up with something amazing and even got compliments on the video! I was so proud of my final product and couldn’t have asked for a better coach. 

Nearing the end of my internship, I received word back from the PRSA-NY Big Apple Awards entry that I submitted earlier in the summer. To my surprise, I was informed that my entry was shortlisted as a nominee for an award or an honorable mention! I was in shock and so excited all at the same time. Lea-Ann and I planned our trip to New York in September for the in-person awards to celebrate the accomplishment. 

Overall, this summer has taught me so much. It taught me that some of the most rewarding experiences are what you can do for other people, hence what I did with the GKC-PRSA social media content and my Z blogs where I helped tell the story of the late Inez Y. Kaiser. I also learned that hard work pays off, even if it’s months or a year later. Here I am, a year after I completed the “Interview with Zinaejah” series and now I get to go to New York City, a place I’ve always wanted to go since I’m a nominee. On top of that, after a long and challenging summer, I was able to complete two PowerPoints on Germinder + Associates and Good News For Pets to add to my portfolio. Everything is paying off and this experience makes me even more excited for what the future holds for me. 

A Conversation with Richlynn Kaiser Bailey, Granddaughter of Inez Y. Kaiser



Writing about Inez Y. Kaiser has been a pleasure and a blessing. Along the way I’ve gotten the chance to learn so much about a powerful Black woman who paved the path before me as well as made connections with a few amazing people who are in the field currently.One of those amazing people was Richlynn Kaiser Bailey, granddaughter of Inez Y. Kaiser. 

Bailey shared her thoughts on the initiative under her grandmother’s name as well as some memorable aspects of her grandmother that she wanted to get across.

“This is a fantastic opportunity to highlight her story and share a little bit about who Inez Kaiser was and what she stood for,” Bailey said. “The scholarship in her name is about paying it forward and supporting students who are aspiring to make their mark in communications. We hope the scholarship will propel recipients forward to pursue their dreams.”

Being a young, Black woman, it’s always inspiring to see people like her who are advocating for the generation below them. I expressed to her some of the anxiety and fears I had when it came to entering the corporate world as I near my senior year at the University of Dayton. 

From this, I learned about her deep commitment to the advancement of women and women of color who are navigating this world and overcoming the feeling of “imposter syndrome” causing one to feel like they aren’t worthy to be in the position they’re in, especially while raising two daughters. 

“I want to raise my girls to be confident and to know that they are enough,” she said. “I want them to know that they are valued and that they have unique and amazing contributions to make in this world. Those are values that my grandmother instilled in me. Working on this scholarship has reminded me of who my grandmother was and what she stood for.”

After learning more about who she was and that she strives to be, we ended with a conversation about leading those following after you. Being an example and a physical representation of what you don’t usually see people like you do is so important in this day and age. 

“Representation is so important, and if you don’t see it, then you don’t know you can be it,” Richlynn Kaiser Bailey said. “Whether you’re considering work at a PR agency, a corporation, a volunteer option, advertising, or whatever it may be, it’s important that people see themselves reflected back.”

Representation matters. Being a part of this initiative for the summer opened my eyes to something important. While I and many others never got to meet Inez Y. Kaiser, we are fortunate enough to get to know her story. Just because we leave this earth doesn’t mean the legacy, accomplishments, and paths we pave for those following behind isn’t remembered and cherished. Inez Y. Kaiser’s legacy will live on forever because she took the time to be a representation of what many women of color can be in life, despite the opinions of those who say we can’t. 

Don’t forget to check out the video I created that emphasizes Inez Y. Kaiser and other modern trailblazers in communications:

Qualifying students can apply for the Inez Y. Kaiser GKC-PRSA Memorial Scholarship now! 

“Interviews With Zinaejah” Series Named to PRSA-NY Big Apple Awards 2021 Shortlist



New York – July 28, 2021 — Germinder + Associates, Inc. is pleased to announce the PRSA-NY Board of Directors has selected the agency’s “Interviews with Zinaejah” entry in the Spotlight Category: Media Relations and Content Marketing. Being on the Shortlist means that Germinder + Associates’s support of Zinaejah Ozier’s work is in consideration for a Big Apple Award or an Honorable Mention.

 According to PRSA-NY, the entry made the Shortlist as a nominee for the 2021 Big Apple Awards by representing the highest standards of excellence in the PR industry. The entry will be showcased amongst public relations peers across the United States during the Big Apple Awards.

Lea-Ann Germinder, APR, Fellow PRSA, Germinder + Associates President is an agency veteran and recipient of the inaugural Makovsky Excellence in Mentoring award. She was looking for appropriate ways to approach the virtual agency experience during the pandemic and during the Black Lives Matter for Ozier, a young Black aspiring journalist turned PR pro-storyteller. The BLM movement was an opportunity for Germinder to listen, for the young intern to create.

“I’ve interviewed many students for internships over the years, but Zinaejah and her creative skills really stood out. The trick was figuring out an internship project where I could mentor her and yet she could still call it her own. With her creativity, interviews with diverse Black leaders I knew became “Interviews with Zinaejah.” Once she completed it, having been a judge, I thought it might have a shot at taking home an award and suggested we enter it in the Big Apple awards. Now we shall meet in person for the first time and hear the final results together on September 28th. No matter what the end result — this project epitomizes for me what mentoring is all about,” said Germinder.

For her part, Ozier is looking forward to spending time in New York, her first trip to the Big Apple.


“I really enjoyed conducting my “Interview with Zinaejah” series and to have it be nominated for an award is truly a blessing. Not only that, it shows me that hard-work pays off…even if it’s a year later! I’m so excited to travel to NYC for the first time, see Lea-Ann for the first time, and enjoy a night of awards. Even If I don’t win any, I’ve already won this amazing experience.” 

Germinder + Associates, Inc. is located in New York City and Kansas City and serves several niche categories including the pet industry. The agency was founded by Lea-Ann Germinder in 1998 and has won numerous business and client service awards including the PRSA Silver Anvil Award of Excellence and IABC Bronze Quill Awards. For more information contact Lea-Ann Germinder, APR, Fellow PRSA at 917-334-8682 or Lgerminder@germinder.com.

 #BigApplePR #BigAppleAwards2021 #GerminderPR

Making a Difference, Starting With the Woman in the Mirror



I’m just a young, Black woman. What difference can I really make? I find myself asking this question to the girl in the mirror constantly. My smile slowly fading to a minimal grin as I stare back at someone who’s just one person. 

The lack of diversity within the classroom has always been something I’ve noticed since I was a kid. Now, in college, it amazes me how much this hasn’t changed. Serving on the executive board of Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) at the University of Dayton, I often feel like there’s something more I need to do in the world of public relations. 

When I first entered the public relations (PR) world in my second semester of sophomore year, I wasn’t shocked to see that I was the only black kid when walking into the room. After all, I attend a predominantly white institution. Now, when dealing with internships and learning about the world of PR, I constantly hear about the lack of diversity around the world in this career field. 

Hearing this statement in the midst of working on an initiative like the Inez Y. Kaiser GKC-PRSA Memorial Scholarship Fund has given me the motivation to want to push forward diversity in the workplace.

That girl who stares back at herself and wonders what change she can make in the world gains her smile back.

Women like Inez Y. Kaiser and any other modern women in communications who have had “firsts” probably had the same thoughts. No, we can’t change the world as one person. However, we can make a difference with the small stepping stones we make.

From graduating from college to breaking stereotypes, I have found that being a Black woman in the professional world in and of itself sets me up to be a trailblazer. For too many years we’ve only seen success as white or male. Looking at Kaiser accomplishing something like launching a firm with national clients as a Black woman is inspiration alone. 

I may not be able to completely turn around the world of PR but I can start somewhere. Simple things like being on the exec board of PRSSA and using my voice on that platform is something

Advocating for change and even hoping for change somehow gives the earth a little push on its axis even further. I can’t wait to see what all I can accomplish with just the girl in the mirror.

Check out this video created by Zinaejah Ozier that emphasizes Inez Y. Kaiser and other modern trailblazers in communication. 

Qualifying students can apply for the Inez Y. Kaiser GKC-PRSA Memorial Scholarship Fund now! 

Don’t be Afraid to Tell Your Story



We all have talents. A lot of us have jobs, but outside of those jobs, our hobbies and down-time activities host some of our most powerful gifts. It’s the things we’re most passionate about that will make the greatest impact in this world. 

I saw this with Inez Kaiser. With roots in journalism she used those writing and communicating skills and transferred that into her journey in the civil rights movement with getting messages across and creating an impact. I want to do this for myself as well.

Whenever I think of things I’m passionate about, I immediately think of the Black story. More specifically, my story. Growing up in a world where having beautiful hair meant you were mixed with something or where the use of proper English made me “better” than other black girls oddly encourages me. 

My second passion of writing and storytelling drives me to tell my story to the world in a creative way.

I used to hate my story. I used to be embarrassed to be from a place like Flint, Michigan. I use to hate having to explain to people that I grew up without my biological mother in my life. All of the things that represent the life of a stereotypical black family was simply embarrassing to me to talk about. However, that’s when I learned exactly why I should love my story. 

The story is the journey. The journey is what makes us who we are. We are everything that our story is and that is why telling that story is so important, no matter who you are.

When I first started writing, I was hit with the hard truth of, “You can’t become better without reading.” As I progressed with my writing and reading skills, I discovered the power of a story. Whether a fairy-tale or a revealed truth within a real-life story, the story itself is something that resonates deep within me. 

Being a future public relations professional, I often think of the impact I can make. That impact includes helping to pave the way for more people like me, just like Inez Kaiser did and telling my story in a creative way in order to showcase all that one can become despite everything they had to do and go through to get where they are today.

Don’t forget about the Inez Y. Kaiser GKC-PRSA Memorial Scholarship Fund! Learn more about it here

Experience as the “Only One” in an Educational Setting



Picture this. It’s 9:00am on a Monday morning. You’re walking to class and you’re trying your hardest to keep your head up after a long weekend of studying, social mishaps, and finding yourself. You get to class and all you see is the back of dozens of heads of people with skin not like yours. You push yourself to relate, but it’s just not working…These are the thoughts that go through my head on a daily basis. 

From the time I was little, I’ve had these experiences. Growing up in a place like Flint, Michigan then moving to the suburbs of Grand Blanc, Michigan in order to get a better education was both rewarding and scarring. Like the scraping at the knee, everything I had known before shifted into a culture that I tried so hard to mold into. 

In classrooms I would sit and glance at the few brown-skinned children with puffy hair in hopes of making an automatic connection in an unknown world. Quickly, I was linked with a child like me, who’s friends became my friends. 

Thinking back on this reminds me of the book, “Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria: And Other Conversations About Race” by Beverly Daniel Tatum. Oftentimes when walking into a school setting, clusters of different races are boldly scattered around the lunch room and on the playground. My own experiences see this phenomenon as a level of comfortability. This same dynamic stands at the university level. 

I sometimes question why segregated school were pronounced unconstitutional decades ago, yet we are still in school were getting a good education means going to a predominantly white school. 

It can be hard attending a school where you’re one of the “only ones.” As a writer, I know the power of relatability and establishing relationships within a story as well as the real world. For this reason, I believe the stress endured by brown-skinned individuals all over campus can be severe. It almost seems like the lack of relatability is so normal that no one really seems to pay attention to what we have to go through. This very situation caused me to be stuck between choosing a HBCU (Historically Black College and University) and a PWI (Predominantly White Institution). On one hand, I wanted to attend a place where my people were better represented and supported in one space. On the other hand, the benefits of a PWI can be far greater when it comes to funding and great opportunities.

For the generations after me, I don’t want them to have to choose. At times, choosing can be the difference between an understanding of one’s mental health and a push to the side due to the normalization of being the only Black kid. 

To read Zinaejah Ozier previous blog, click here.

A Word on Juneteenth and the Importance of Standing Up for What You Believe



I used to sit and watch as the colorful fireworks flew through the sky and sliced through the air with a big boom or crackle. I used to love the 4th of July. Being able to stay up all night and from wherever I was, I could see beauty in the night sky, kissing the stars. 

According to Britannica, Juneteenth became a state holiday in Texas in 1980, and a number of other states followed suit. The day is also celebrated outside the United States, with organizations in a number of countries using the day to recognize the end of slavery and to celebrate the culture and achievements of African Americans.

With Juneteenth coming up, I started to think back to what else school didn’t teach me. This holiday has become such an important topic with the rise in police brutality and the high demand for justice for the black community. However, I never learned about this holiday until my college years. As I stare at the Juneteenth celebrations that have gone on in other states like Texas, I crave the heartwarming gatherings that stamp the day that my people actually gained their independence from the country that claimed they were “free.” 

This craving got me thinking of the time when Inez Y. Kaiser went to Pittsburg State where one instructor told all the black students to leave the room. Kaiser responded with, “I’m not going anywhere.” I couldn’t help but picture the famous “no” stated by the one and only Rosa Parks. Year after year, generation after generation, it feels like the black community is slowly standing up for ourselves. Although I live in a country that doesn’t always accept my black skin, I’m gradually watching legends like Kaiser and Parks show me that I don’t have to be afraid. 

I believe the same thing goes for Juneteenth. Gatherings of hundreds of Black people celebrating our true independence should become normalized. Yeah, the 4th of July is fun, but this can be too. Most importantly, it can be ours. Celebrating my black skin should be festive, and not odd. Loud, and not hidden. Simply unhidden for young boys and girls like me, who were blind to the essence of our culture due to the overbearing “American” culture that isn’t even ours. I hope that one day, I won’t have to say, “no” like Inez Y. Kaiser and Rosa Parks. I hope to live in a country that openly recognizes my skin and sees it as good and not bad. 

Don’t forget to check out Z Blog #1 on our site!

Also, don’t forget about the Inez Y. Kaiser GKC-PRSA Memorial Scholarship Fund! Learn more about it here

The Launch of the Z Blog and A Scholarship Too!



BLOGPOST#1

Zinaejah Ozier is returning to Germinder + Associates this summer with the debuts of the “Z Blog” as an extension of last summer’s “Interviews with Zinaejah.”  Her first post coincides with the launch of the Inez Y. Kaiser GKC-PRSA Memorial Scholarship. Details on the scholarship here.

Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, Frederick Douglass. Each of these powerful names ring an alarming bell in the heads of many across the country. Now, with the series of events that took a toll on our country in the summer of 2020, many pronounce the name of the victims who have lost their lives to police brutality and injustice with the famous hashtag, #saytheirname.

So many names spoken, yet so many names unheard of. In my return as an intern here at Germinder + Associates, I was introduced to Inez Y. Kaiser, a Black woman I had never heard of. 

With my constant presence in the field of writing for almost my whole life, it surprised me that I was never taught about her. What surprised me the most was the number of things we had in common. Both Kaiser and I were part of journalism, PR, and most of all, we are Black, we are women, and we are in America. 

First introduced to me by Germinder + Associates president and founder, Lea-Ann Germinder, APR, Fellow, PRSA with her initiative as Co-Founder and Chair of the Inez Y. Kaiser GKC-PRSA Memorial Scholarship Fund Advisory Committee to create a scholarship under the name of Kaiser, I wanted to be a part of this. Knowing that there was someone like me who took giant leaps in the same field as me gave me hope. 

I remember reading a piece called, “In Search of Our Mother’s Gardens” by Alice Walker during my freshman year at the University of Dayton (UD). I remember taking a pause after only the first page due to the relatability of the piece. Tears of sadness and joy falling like raindrops onto the bottom of the page provided me with a deeper understanding of why I felt the way I did at times. As a Black woman in America, I am in constant search of the gardens of our ancestors who suffered, mourned, and sang deeply rooted songs to numb their pain. A pain so deep that generations later, I too can feel that pain, especially when a victim of injustice is murdered on camera.

As my main focus of the previous summer was to listen to Black professionals and get insight on their journeys, I wanted to tell my own story. My journey of entering a classroom filled with white students at a PWI. My journey of taking a leap of faith and sitting on the board of my Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) chapter as the only black student in the organization. My journey of trying to navigate a world so heavily flawed, that my black skin is mistaken as blob of ignorance and anger. 

Like Inez, I want to pave the road to success for aspiring young black woman after me and change the world of PR for good. I want the world to know her name. With this series I plan to share her story and mine. I want the world to not only read my words, but to feel them, just as Alice Walker and Inez Y. Kaiser did for me. 

Power of Pink Virtual Internship: Question of the Day



QOD post

Our Power of Pink Virtual Internship has come to an end and so have the many Zoom calls with founder Lea-Ann Germinder along with interns, Abby Crotty and Zinaejah Ozier. Within those Zoom calls, they always found a way to make the day more interesting with their “Question of the Day” daily questions.

Some of the questions were on the serious list, while others challenged their brains to think about the things they’ve never really thought about before.

Here were some of the questions and answers that they came up with throughout the summer:

Top 3 QOD

If your house was burning down and you could save one material thing, what would it be (assuming your phone is in your pocket!)?

“My computer” – Zinaejah Ozier

“My computer” – Lea-Ann Germinder

“My big box of memorabilia” – Abby Crotty

If you could have one superpower what would it be?

“Teleport anywhere and not have to worry about COVID-19” – Abby Crotty

“Not to sleep, there are so many things I want to do and not enough time to do them” – Lea-Ann Germinder

“Ability to speed through work, but with accuracy” – Zinaejah Ozier

What has been your biggest challenge to date and why?

“The pandemic and having the internship fall through” – Abby Crotty

“Going to school online, then having the internship online from 9-6 Monday to Thursday 9-1 on Friday and forgetting to eat and drink. I just want to get the work done and I forget to stop” – Zinaejah Ozier

“My parents got divorced when I was young, but it taught me to be resilient and plow through challenges – like this pandemic!  – Lea-Ann Germinder

In the end, whether the question was happy or sad, the “question of the day” always seemed to be the thing that pushed them through the long work-day. Now, it has come to a close, but their Q&A sessions will never be forgotten.

A Zinaejah Ozier Interview: Lea-Ann Germinder



Lea-Ann Interview
Lea-Ann Germinder, APR, Fellow PRSA, President of Germinder + Associates

Getting an internship is one thing. Learning about how you got an internship is another. In an interview with the president of our company, Lea-Ann Germinder, Zinaejah Ozier got the opportunity to get insight on the perspective of her employer.

From hearing about why she was selected to getting feedback on the ways in which she was able to partake in reverse mentoring, Ozier asked Germinder a series of questions to seal her Power of Pink Internship experience. When asked about the selection process, Germinder explained the significance of reaching out to her alma mater, the University of Dayton.

“My main goal was to help students during the pandemic,” said Germinder. “I was really troubled that many agencies decided not to have internships during the pandemic, and I thought maybe I could help out. I had wanted to reach back to the University of Dayton for quite some time and PRSA sent out a communication, suggesting that we try to help. So, I reached out to the University of Dayton and we went from there.”

After reaching out to UD in an effort to grant two lucky students with a chance to gain experience at an agency during hard times, Lea-Ann heavily considered the potential compatibility between the two interns, Abby Crotty and Zinaejah Ozier.

“Here you had yourself, who was a journalism student that was transferring from journalism to public relations, a great storyteller, and I was very impressed with your writing,” said Germinder. “Then, you had Abby, who is a senior legacy student who wanted to do digital content and I thought, gee, this could be really interesting. It turned out to be really true. You two created magic together.”

To top the interview off, Ozier was curious to know how Germinder felt about their summer experience overall. Since she and Crotty had conducted their own interview discussing their thoughts on their experience, hearing from Germinder…

“Learning during the pandemic was a challenge, but we rose to that challenge,” said Lea-Ann.  “The Black Lives Matter movement was so important, and it was so impactful that we ended up not discussing some logistical things that we may have ended up discussing, but there’s always time to discuss that. At the end of the day, I think it’s so important to give back every single day and I’m thrilled with how the internship turned out.”

With a goal of giving the girls a taste of the world of public relations and helping them to follow their passion, the internship has shown itself to serve that exact purpose.

To watch the full interview, click here!

To hear what interns Abby Crotty and Zinaejah Ozier had to say about their internship experience, click here!